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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Results for:Terry Mitchell

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Total Resources: 10

Towards an Indigenous-Informed Relational Approach to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC)
Scientific Paper

2019 - English - Academic

Towards an Indigenous-Informed Relational Ap...

Courtney Arseneau, Darren Thomas, Peggy Smith et al.


The article, based on several years of dialogue and interviews and a two-day workshop on FPIC, offers insight into Indigenous perspectives on FPIC advancing an Indigenous-informed relational approach to consultation and consent seeking.

Realizing Indigenous Rights in the Context of Extractive Imperialism: Canada's shifting and fledgling progress towards the implementation of UNDRIP
Scientific Paper

This article addresses Canada’s shifting yet fledgling progress towards the harmonisation of Canadian domestic law and the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. The pathway to reconciliation and sustainable development for Canada is discussed as rights-based resource governance in contrast to Canad...

Canada's decision in 2010 to sign the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples represented much more than a change of federal government policies. The belated action, coming three years after the UN passed this historic agreement, marked the high point in the generations-long struggle for the recognition of Aboriginal rights.

Considering the Triple Bottom Line of Good Governance
Essay

2012 - English - Practical

Considering the Triple Bottom Line of Good G...

Ken Coates, Terry Mitchell


Good governance is a foundation of effective social development where Indigenous people contribute to re-development of the Fourth World. UNDRIP principles of participation and consent include Indigenous rights to participate in decision-making and consult using FPIC before adopting measures that affect them.

Idle No More challenges to the integrity of the nation state and are not revolutionary. They call on the Government and people of Canada to share national wealth, to adhere to Canadian law, to negotiate new arrangements where existing treaties are insufficient, and to adjust national policy to better suit needs and aspirations.

UNDRIP: Shifting from Global Aspiration to Local Realization
Essay

The core lesson in the creation of UNDRIP was simple: collective action by Indigenous peoples could force major changes in national and international law. The process of improving conditions for Indigenous peoples has now moved to a different level. The socio-economic and cultural problems of Indigenous have been described globally, really for t...

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