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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Total Resources: 15

Governance in forestry is beginning to include more actors in decision-making processes. This article explores the role of Aboriginal peoples in governing the Canadian forest sector. In a case study of Essipit Innu First Nation in Quebec (Canada) the Essipit community effectively co-governed forest management decisions with a forestry company at the operational level. The effectiveness of this initiative was due to collaboration and common values between both parties.

Increasing the Sustainability of a Resource Development: Aboriginal Engagement and Negotiated Agreements
Scientific Paper

This article discusses Aboriginal peoples engagement in Negotiated Agreements (IBAs) and Environmental Impact Assessments as a way in which to produce more sustainable development projects. The author suggests that by negotiating with businesses directly, Aboriginal peoples are able to get around the limitations of government legislation and ensure their communities and lands are protected. A Case Study of Galore Creek, on the traditional territory of Tahltan Nation is proposed as an example of sustainable development.

This article takes a critical approach in presenting FPIC as a key principle of governance used to tackle issues to do with extractive industry development on Indigenous land. FPIC is discussed as a way to achieve justice by moving from central to local governments through processes of negotiations and engagement.

Aboriginal Participation in Mineral Development: Environmental Assessment and Impact-Benefit Agreements
Scientific Paper

This paper discusses the use of Impact Benefit Agreements (IBAs) negotiated between industry and Indigenous communities, and Environmental Assessments (EA) that are legislated by the Canadian Government. The author argues that IBAs and EA have the potential to encourage the consultation and partnership of Indigenous people in the development process, with positive impacts on the development project. The Tahltan Nation’s use of IBAs and EA in the Galore Creek Project is examined as a case study.

Demanding Free, Prior and Informed Consent Across Borders - Making Rights Real in Colombia
News Article

2012 - English - Technical

Demanding Free, Prior and Informed Consent A...

Aviva Chomsky


This article discusses a workshop that was conducted in Colombia in partnership between a U.S. based grassroots organization called Witness for Peace (WfP) and local community activists in Guatemala and Colombia. In the workshop, Guatemalans who had successfully been using FPIC to withhold their consent to development projects, taught the Colombians strategies with which to resist industry using community consultations and advocacy.

Rights Talk in Belize - Q'eqchi Maya Communities Meet Across Borders
News Article

This article discusses the efforts of Matilde Chocooj Coc, a Q’eqchi Mayan woman from Guatemala, who travelled to another Q’eqchi Mayan community in Belize, Crique Sarco, in order to share strategies for exercising their rights to FPIC as outlined in International law. The point of this meeting was to ensure that leaders in Crique Sarco were given instruction in order to negotiate with a proposed Texas-based oil company.

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