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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Total Resources: 4

This article explores what is “good” practice in social impact assessment (SIA). SIA addresses social issues in development through participatory processes that support affected peoples, and companies. SIA seeks to increase understanding of and responses to change, and avoid negative impacts while enhancing positive benefits. The author argues that SIA practices need to address culture, community, power, human rights, gender, justice, place, resilience, and sustainable livelihoods.

Human rights, Indigenous peoples and the concept of Free, Prior and Informed Consent
Scientific Paper

The article explores the rights of Indigenous peoples to participate in decision-making about resource development projects as a key part of their self-determination. The article discusses the role and responsibility of corporations in ensuring that Indigenous peoples’ right to Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) as included under the United Nations Declaration of the Rights of Indigneous Peoples (UNDRIP). The authors suggest that corporations should practice FPIC even when it is not legally legislated.

This paper discusses various contemporary issues surrounding human rights, Indigenous peoples and their relationship with the extractive industries, focusing on the Brazilian context.

Is free, prior and informed consent a form of corporate social responsibility?
Scientific Paper

2016 - English - Technical

Is free, prior and informed consent a form o...

Frank Vanclay, Toyah Rodhouse


Organizations across the world are starting to include Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) and human rights standards in their Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) documents. The authors of this article argue characteristics of CSR are not inherently well-matched with tenants of basic human rights and FPIC is often included in CSR documents to serve the role of preventing societal backlash against corporate actions.