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Knowledge is Power

This website provides information and resources on FPIC as a tool of self-determination to assist communities in decision making. We have selected articles, tool kits, videos, voice messages, and community stories about FPIC and consultation.

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Results for:Courtney Fidler

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Total Resources: 3

Increasing the Sustainability of a Resource Development: Aboriginal Engagement and Negotiated Agreements
Scientific Paper

This article discusses Aboriginal peoples engagement in Negotiated Agreements (IBAs) and Environmental Impact Assessments as a way in which to produce more sustainable development projects. The author suggests that by negotiating with businesses directly, Aboriginal peoples are able to get around the limitations of government legislation and ensure their communities and lands are protected. A Case Study of Galore Creek, on the traditional territory of Tahltan Nation is proposed as an example of sustainable development.

Aboriginal Participation in Mineral Development: Environmental Assessment and Impact-Benefit Agreements
Scientific Paper

This paper discusses the use of Impact Benefit Agreements (IBAs) negotiated between industry and Indigenous communities, and Environmental Assessments (EA) that are legislated by the Canadian Government. The author argues that IBAs and EA have the potential to encourage the consultation and partnership of Indigenous people in the development process, with positive impacts on the development project. The Tahltan Nation’s use of IBAs and EA in the Galore Creek Project is examined as a case study.

Impact and Benefit Agreements: A Contentious Issue for Environmental and Aboriginal Justice
Scientific Paper

This paper discusses the conflicts surrounding the use of Impact and Benefit Agreements (IBAs) negotiated between Indigenous communities and development companies. They suggest that these agreements exist outside of the legal framework of Environmental Assessment (EA) which generates conflict with environmental regulation. They also examine the conflict that can emerge when IBAs continue to negatively impact Indigenous peoples by not distributing mining benefits equitably between parties.